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MARTIN GROVE'S HOLLYWOOD REPORT -- OSCAR OUTCOME -- 2/27/17


 
MOONLIGHT - MAHERSHALA ALI  AT SAG AWARDS

MOONLIGHT - MAHERSHALA ALI AT SAG AWARDS

LA LA LAND - EMMA STONE AT SAG AWARDS

LA LA LAND - EMMA STONE AT SAG AWARDS

LA LA LAND - DIRECTOR DAMIEN CHAZELLE AT GOLDEN GLOBES

LA LA LAND - DIRECTOR DAMIEN CHAZELLE AT GOLDEN GLOBES

MARTIN GROVE'S HOLLYWOOD REPORT --

OSCAR OUTCOME -- 2/27/17

 

 Oscar outcome: The Oscar bellwethers that were ringing for months have stopped and now that we know how Academy members voted we can decide whom to trust next year.

Of course, with "La La Land" winning and then finding out that it actually lost best picture to "Moonlight," it makes looking back at how other awards givers voted a great way to end the unending awards season.

For what it's worth, I'm happy to point out that in my Jan. 30 column "Contender Comparisons" I calculated the advantages that each of the nine best picture nominees had at that point, based on their wins in some prime races plus some other key factors. My calculations favored "Moonlight" to win best picture:

"If we add up the number of advantages listed above for each film, scoring one point per mention, the totals are: "Moonlight" (6), "Hacksaw" (4), "LLL" (4), "Lion" (4), "Arrival" (3), "Fences" (3), "Hidden" (3), "Manchester" (3) and "Hell" (1)."

You can check that column out by clicking on this link to www.ZAMM.com:

I've also observed in other recent columns that the Academy likes to celebrate best pictures that are about something important and "LLL" just didn't fit that definition. To be honest, by the end of the race I was thinking that "Hidden Figures" had a better shot than "Moonlight" at winning best picture because it was a much bigger boxoffice success and was about women who were national heroes. In any case, "LLL" seemed to be the safest bet to win top honors.

Upon hearing Beatty announce that "LLL" had won, I accepted that Academy members had opted to applaud their own business rather than vote for something "important" as they typically do. It was an OMG moment to suddenly discover they hadn't done that at all. How do we find out if it was Russian hacking?

The unbelievably appalling conclusion to what had been a truly outstanding Oscar show up to that moment is so amazing that I'm almost at a loss for words. Clearly, Warren Beatty knew there was something wrong with the card in the sealed envelope when he opened it. He looked at it and wondered what the hell he was seeing.

 Of course, Beatty should have said something about not having the appropriate category card in his hands. Instead, he passed the buck to Faye Dunaway, who had no idea that there was a problem. She just saw the words "La La Land" on the card he was showing her and so she announced the winner. Who would have thought that it was a duplicate of the Best Actress winner card?

It was a horrible conclusion to an otherwise great show. As Oscar shows go, the 89th annual festivities would have been remembered as the best in recent memory if it weren't for this one "little" snafu just as everyone was about to head out the door.

Most of the credit for what was good Oscar night goes to Jimmy Kimmel, who was an outstanding host and, hopefully, can be persuaded to return again next year. Of course, the Academy will have to convince him that it can actually get the right names in the sealed envelopes from now on!

Kimmel's opening monologue comments about Meryl Streep were so right-on-the-money that they will be long remembered as a classic Oscar Night moment.

Kimmel also did a terrific job of handling the segment where a Hollywood tour bus group was surprised by being brought into the Dolby Theatre and led onstage and then introduced by Kimmel to the stars sitting in the front row. Kimmel turned that stunt into a funny and engaging feel-good moment.

In addition, Kimmel handled the silly business of parachuting candy and doughnuts down into the audience for the "starving" Oscar attendees with just the right touch. He also tossed out some pointed political barbs that kept his audience hungry for more.

But leave it to the Academy – they just can't get it right. This time around they got diversity right, they got the host right and they got the "entertainment" segments right – but they couldn't manage to get the right winner's name in the sealed envelope! Say what you will about the Golden Globes where everyone's a winner – but, at least, in the correct category. Oscar will never live down Sunday's screw-up.

What used to look like Oscar's big problem – well, not anymore! -- is that it comes at the end of a seemingly endless awards season with mostly the same winners celebrating over and over. By the time Oscar Night rolls around, it's the same people accepting the same awards with the same thank-you's, personal remarks and passionate political diatribes. About all that's different are the gowns marching down the red carpet.

It's unlikely that this timetable will be revised any time soon, if ever, as moving the Oscars earlier by even a few weeks would simply prompt everybody else to move their own shows back a few weeks to compensate for the Academy's change. No one would want to follow the Oscars because by then no one would care who won an award that couldn't in some way impact on Academy voters.

Moreover, an earlier awards calendar would play havoc with established distribution patterns that put awards contenders into theatres when studios think the timing is best for Academy consideration. So we're stuck with the Oscars as the anti-climax to their own awards season.

Nonetheless, with the 89th annual Oscars happily now history, it's interesting to compare the final actual real results to how other high profile awards givers voted in nine prime categories. Each award voted elsewhere that turned out to match how Academy members voted is indicated here with an O.

(1) BEST PICTURE

OSCAR: "Moonlight"

BAFTA: "La La Land"

GOLDEN GLOBES: "La La Land" (comedy or musical) and "Moonlight" (drama)

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: "La La Land"

SAG: "Hidden Figures"

PGA: "La La Land"

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW: "Manchester by the Sea"

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE: "La La Land"

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: "Moonlight" O

(2) BEST DIRECTING

OSCAR: Damien Chazelle ("La La Land")

DGA: Damien Chazelle ("La La Land") O

BAFTA: Damien Chazelle ("La La Land") O

GOLDEN GLOBES: Damien Chazelle ("La La Land") O

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Damien Chazelle ("La La Land") O

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW: Barry Jenkins ("Moonlight")

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE: Barry Jenkins ("Moonlight")

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Barry Jenkins ("Moonlight")

(3) BEST ACTOR

OSCAR: Casey Affleck ("Manchester by the Sea")

BAFTA: Casey Affleck ("Manchester by the Sea") O

GOLDEN GLOBES: Drama - Casey Affleck ("Manchester by the Sea") O; Comedy or Musical – Ryan Gosling ("La La Land")

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Casey Affleck ("Manchester by the Sea") O

SAG: Denzel Washington ("Fences")

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW: Casey Affleck ("Manchester by the Sea") O

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE: Casey Affleck ("Manchester by the Sea") O

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Adam Driver ("Paterson")

(4) BEST ACTRESS

OSCAR: Emma Stone ("La La Land")

BAFTA: Emma Stone ("La La Land") O

GOLDEN GLOBES: Drama – Isabelle Huppert ("Elle"); Comedy or Musical – Emma Stone ("La La Land") O

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Natalie Portman ("Jackie")

SAG: Emma Stone ("La La Land") O

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW: Amy Adams ("Arrival")

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE: Isabelle Huppert ("Elle")

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Isabelle Huppert ("Elle" & "Things to Come")

(5) BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

OSCAR: Mahershala Ali  ("Moonlight")

BAFTA: Dev Patel ("Lion")

GOLDEN GLOBES: Aaron Taylor Johnson ("Nocturnal Animals")

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Mahershala Ali  ("Moonlight") O

SAG: Mahershala Ali  ("Moonlight") O

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW: Jeff Bridges ("Hell or High Water")

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE: Mahershala Ali  ("Moonlight") O

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Mahershala Ali  ("Moonlight") O

(6) BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

OSCAR: Viola Davis ("Fences")

BAFTA: Viola Davis ("Fences") O

GOLDEN GLOBES: Viola Davis ("Fences") O

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Viola Davis ("Fences") O

SAG: Viola Davis ("Fences") O

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW: Naomie Harris ("Moonlight ")

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE: Michelle Williams  ("Manchester by the Sea")

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Lily Gladstone ("Certain Women")

(7) BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

OSCAR: Kenneth Lonergan ("Manchester by the Sea")

BAFTA: Kenneth Lonergan ("Manchester by the Sea") O

GOLDEN GLOBES: Damien Chazelle ("La La Land") (NOTE: The Globes does not have separate original and adaptation categories.)

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: A tie between Damien Chazelle ("La La Land") and Kenneth Lonergan ("Manchester by the Sea") O

WGA: Barry Jenkins ("Moonlight") (Story by Tarell McCraney)

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW: Kenneth Lonergan ("Manchester by the Sea") O

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE: Kenneth Lonergan ("Manchester by the Sea") (NOTE: The NYFCC does not have separate original and adaptation categories.) O

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Efthymis Filippou and Yorgos Lanthimos ("The Lobster") (NOTE: The LAFCA does not have separate original and adaptation categories.)

(8) BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

OSCAR: Barry Jenkins ("Moonlight") (Story by Tarell McCraney)

BAFTA: Luke Davies ("Lion")

GOLDEN GLOBES: Damien Chazelle ("La La Land") (NOTE: The Globes does not have separate original and adaptation categories.)

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Eric Hesserer ("Arrival")

WGA: Eric Hesserer ("Arrival") (Story by Ted Chiang)

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW: Jay Cocks and Martin Scorsese ("Silence")

NEW YORK FILM CRITICS CIRCLE: Kenneth Lonergan ("Manchester by the Sea") (NOTE: The NYFCC does not have separate original and adaptation categories.)

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Efthymis Filippou and Yorgos Lanthimos ("The Lobster") (NOTE: The LAFCA does not have separate original and adaptation categories.)

(9) BEST FILM EDITING

OSCAR: John Gilbert ("Hacksaw Ridge")

BAFTA: John Gilbert ("Hacksaw Ridge") O

BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Tom Cross  ("La La Land")

AMERICAN CINEMA EDITORS (ACE) : Drama – Joe Walker ("Arrival"); and Comedy - Tom Cross  ("La La Land")

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION: Bret Granato, Maya Mumma and Ben Sozanski ("OJ: Made in America")

Bottom line: There wasn't much to celebrate at last weekend's boxoffice other than Universal and Blumhouse Productions' "Get Out." The R rated horror comedy thriller opened in first place to a better than expected $30.5 million. It reportedly cost under $5 million to produce.

Lionsgate and Summit Entertainment's PG rated 3D animated comedy "Rock Dog" opened quietly in 11th place with $3.7 million.

Open Road Films and Silver Pictures' PG-13 rated action thriller "Collide" opened an unlucky 13th with $1.5 million.

None of Oscar's nine best picture contenders made it into the Top 5. 20th Century Fox and Chernin Entertainment's "Hidden Figures" came the closest, placing seventh with $5.9 million and a domestic cume of $152.8 million. Lionsgate's "La La Land" was eighth with $4.6 million and a domestic cume of $140.9 million.

Oscar weekend ticket sales suffered as they typically do from Sunday's telecast and red carpet coverage. Movie fans stayed home Sunday in front of their flat screens instead of paying to watch movies at their multiplexes' wide screens.

All films in the marketplace grossed about $118.5 million, according to comScore's tracking. That was up about 5.6 percent from $112.3 million this time last year when 20th Century Fox and Marvel Entertainment's "Deadpool" placed first in its third week with $31.1 million.

The up weekend helped the year-to-date boxoffice -- $1.71 billion vs. $1.75 billion a year ago, per comScore. While that's down 2.7 percent, a week earlier comScore had 2017 down 5.4 percent from last year.

Next weekend will see the arrival at about 3,900 theatres of Fox and Marvel's R rated Wolverine/X-Men spinoff "Logan."  Lionsgate and Summit Entertainment's PG-13 rated fantasy drama "The Shack" opens at about 2,500 theatres. And Open Road Films' PG-13 rated drama "Before I Fall" kicks off at about 2,200 theatres.

A year earlier, Disney's PG rated animated comedy adventure "Zootopia" opened to $75.1 million and went on to gross $341.3 million domestically. Sunday night it won the Oscar for best animated feature.